Paid ads and promos for books. The feedback. Thanks!

Just Olga

Hi all:

As you’ll remember, a few weeks ago I asked for your thoughts and feedback on paid ads and other kinds of promotions to try and sell your books. I promised to come back with a post trying to summarise the comments. As I shared the post in other places, I also got comments in Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks all for the comments, and although, of course, the numbers and the differences between people’s circumstances and books mean this is in no way scientific, I thought I’d collect common themes and mention some of the points that seemed to come through for me.

By the way, just in case you don’t remember or want to read the original post again, it is here.

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Promoting your giveaways, special promos:

As I had read before, most people seem to think that Bookbub is a good option, although difficult to get…

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#Newcover ‘The Man Who Never Was’ and revisiting the first post about the novel

Just Olga

Hi all:

As you’ll remember, a few weeks ago I shared the previous versions of the cover for my first novel ‘The Man Who Never Was‘. Thanks so much for the replies that gave Lourdes (my friend and cover designer) and I plenty to go on and to think about.

Following on from that post, the book has a new cover, I have decided to change the categories (I don’t think it’ll ever easily fit anywhere, but as a friend and author [hi Martie!] said, we’ll have to keep waiting for the category for odd books to come alive). And looking back I remembered a series of posts that had a few of the characters of the book talking about themselves and the story. As at the time I didn’t know most of you, I thought I could leave you with the first one in the…

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THE OWL LADY PRESENTS GUEST AUTHOR: Gavil L. Hill

Viv Drewa - The Owl Lady

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Against the Odds

Originally from Bournemouth, Gavin L. Hill now lives just south of Gothenburg, on the west coast of Sweden. The Product of a dysfunctional family, he found himself in foster care at the tender age of three. It was soon after that he became ill. So ill in fact that it was pretty much assumed he was going to die. The doctors were unable to give a clear diagnose, although he temporarily went blind and became paralyzed down the left-hand side. He began school long after his fellow students and as they rushed headlong into basic education, he found myself falling by the wayside. At fifteen years of age he was not only living on the streets, but was totally illiterate.

    It wasn’t long before he was getting into serious trouble and it was then that he decided to make a new start. Had it not been…

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Drop-down Amazon Reviews

Nicholas C. Rossis

I found this on the Self Publishing Review and had to share. Apparently, Amazon has been toying with the idea of using drop-down menus for reviews. I guess they’re trying to encourage readers to leave reviews, by simplifying the review process.

I also suspect that Amazon is trying to improve their search engine and optimize their suggestions. Having a standardized means of classification is a much more efficient way of searching, and using the public to do so is probably the only way of achieving this without hiring half the Earth’s population.

The new review form is as follows:

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

These are the submenu contents:

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksNow, will this be helpful? Amazon is obviously not convinced, hence the beta-testing. A lot of authors will be upset to find their books reduced to half a dozen simple questions. And readers will probably want to say something more than that an author’s writing was “okay.”

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Should authors have their book edited? By K J Rollinson

MARSocial Author Business Enhancement Dragon Post

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There’s never been a text written that didn’t need editing. Indeed, I’ll say as Indie authors we have a duty to aim at a high standard, and one way is to ensure that they are edited to a professional standard.

An editor’s primary connection to the book is the manuscript itself. You can edit it yourself time and time again; give it to friends to edit, but you, or they, will not necessarily see the mistakes. They’re not going to approach the text with the kind of eye for detail that a professional editor brings.

I saw a comment recently on Facebook on editing and quote it below:

‘Each individual author is responsible for their own editing and content. I do not want this project to be like those other stuck up compilations who believe only the BEST should be able to submit. The emphases on this very project is…

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